Archives for posts with tag: Joss Whedon

BtVS & Angel

Here it is. Initially I’d had the goal of posting a detailed review for each of the 254 episodes, and I got as far as the middle of season three before losing the energy and focus, but not the OCD need to catalogue and compare. So even as I gave up the ghost on 254 blog entries, I continued to jot down impressions of episodes and rank them within seasons. My re-watch ended up taking over three years! This summer, I dug everything up, and several hundred index cards and a spread sheet later, I have the complete list.

I waffled on whether to start at the bottom of or the top, eventually settling on the former, mostly because I believe in the old adage of saving the best for last, though I hadn’t realized how negative my takes on the lower end wound up. In my heart, though, I love both series through and through and can find something of worth in every episode.

The spread sheet is embedded at the end of the list with episodes listed in alphabetical order. The 44 episode posts that I did a few years ago are linked at the bottom of each capsule review here.

Thanks to Mr. Lousy and Doris W. for introducing me to the Buffyverse!


#254: The Girl in Question (Angel 5.20)
written by Steven S. DeKnight and Drew Goddard
directed by David Greenwalt

! Angel - The Girl in Question

Egregiously tone-deaf, sorely misplaced comedy episode that derails the building momentum toward the series finale. As everyone reels from the death of Fred and the impending apocalypse, Angel and Spike go on a goofball mission to Italy and match wits with a never-seen, never-before-mentioned nemesis. It’s a trip filled with one thudding joke after another, like a disastrous pilot for a sitcom spin-off. Worse yet, it’s a deflated goodbye to Buffy, shown only briefly by a body double and referenced by the unfunny, unwelcome Andrew. And worst of all, the flashbacks flop miserably, making our series farewell to Darla and Cordelia a footnote begging to be expunged from the show’s lore. All of this stands in jarring contrast to the B-story, a surprise visit from Fred’s parents and Illyria’s impromptu impersonation of the deceased. These potentially powerful, tragic scenes lose most of their impact from the inane Abbott (Angel) & Costello (Spike) bickering that they’re thoughtlessly sandwiched between. A mind-numbing misstep torpedoed into one of the Buffyverse’s greatest arcs. Read the rest of this entry »

Discussion just before the pack forms. I had to include this for Buffy's zoo excursion ensemble

I had to include this for Buffy’s zoo excursion ensemble. Jacket material?

This one I was dreading almost as much as the Insect Substitute, so it came as a pleasant surprise when I not only didn’t hate the episode, I rather liked it. The equation of a high school clique and a pack of hyenas, both preying on the small and weak while spilling out peals of hideous laughter, speaks to me more than all of the adolescent romance in other episodes early in the series, and the dodgeball game made quite clear the dynamics of both clique and pack: when faced with a threatening lone adversary, the hyenas switched their target to the nerdy Read the rest of this entry »

Whiskey after the Apocalypse. It’s all really going somewhere. Sometimes you have to look at the forest instead of the trees. The episodes are uneven, but the series is not.

I insisted that Mr. Lousy watch Joss Whedon’s Dollhouse this summer, and now my recommendation has been called into question. I am here to respond in part. I take complete responsibility for the recommendation and do not rue making it, though I do have some new thoughts after viewing it sort of in tandem with Lousy, though for me it Read the rest of this entry »

I just finished Dollhouse. I’m a little burned out on the Olympics or as NBC presents it – swimming/diving, volleyball, gymnastics and track. I can’t believe I had to go to Bravo at 6am to watch tennis. But I digress.

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Watching The Thirteenth Floor was for me sort of like going back in time, but not skipping alternate realities like in this movie – going back in time to the nineties video store in Chicago that was housed in the garden apartment on Read the rest of this entry »

Avengers star Harry Dean Stanton dazzles on the red carpet at the film premiere.

  • We arrive about mid-way through the first film, the Pixar movie Brave.  It seems that marionnettes are working in conjunction with the Pixar creation team.  The film looks cute.  I am surprised it focuses on a mother-daughter relationship since most kid movies are boy-centered.  We like it and wish we had shown up earlier, but we were there to see Avengers.

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Dollhouse doesn’t have a lot of good times. Let’s celebrate this one, even though it’s provoked by the accidental and possibly catastrophic release of a chemical agent that has the potential of a weapon of mass destruction.

In working my way through a second viewing of the series Dollhouse, I believe I have now reached the point at which Mr. Lousy and I can finally now watch episodes in tandem.  This might be just the right spot for our summit.

“Echoes” is one of my favorite Dollhouse episodes.  I won’t say favorite because I’m re-evaluating as I make my second trip, and I don’t want to be presumptive, especially about my own tastes.

I know the episode has notoriety for its humor: everyone goes on a weird drug trip and it’s hilarious.

True and not true.  There is a lot more going on besides straitlaced control-freaks flipping out on something between highly potent weed and LSD.  The weaving of the comic, the tragic, character revelation, and partial exposition proves that the series could produce not only a fantastic episode, but also an episode that would move the Read the rest of this entry »

So often pilots don’t have the feel for the shows that they will later become.

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Ok Raul. I’ve watched the first three episodes of Dollhouse. I’m going to wait till I watch the whole season before I write about it in full but I thought I’d give you updates along the way. By the way, I’m glad I waited until the third episode to even look for Read the rest of this entry »

I’ll get to the movie.  Give me a minute.

In considering Joss Whedon’s TV series, Dollhouse, I recognized that the Dolls could easily be interpreted as Whedon’s meta-commentary on his creation, use, and sometimes disposal of characters, particularly female ones.  (I’ll never forgive him for what he did with Cordelia on Angel.)  Joss Whedon is acutely aware of his position as creator and how his faithfully, or obsessively, his fan base follows his creations.  After Buffy, Angel, and Firefly, he was due some navel-gazing with Dollhouse.

Yet I chose to watch the show from more of a sci-fi perspective than from the standpoint of how a creator considers his creations.  I found the questions raised in Dollhouse about humanness, Read the rest of this entry »