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I feel oddly isolated in my lukewarm experience of Mad Max: Fury Road. I took it in second-run this week in a packed house with a quite enthusiastic audience, including my boyfriend, who, after the show, unprompted but conscious of both my predilections and peeves, asked with a resigned sigh, “Did you hate it?”

“No,” I answered, “but I didn’t like it.”

I have a sense that I was the only one streaming out of that theater feeling decidedly indifferent to Mad Max: Fury Road.

I’ll concede the film magnificently rolls out relentless action, badass characters, badder-ass vehicles, and breathtaking stunts throughout its two-hour car chase, yet through all the frenetic thrill, I, in my advancing middle age and tendency toward rumination, was left wondering, Is that all there is? Is that all there is to a post-apocalyptic blockbuster?” 

Part of my disillusionment stems from the glut of grim apocalypses set upon cinema since the millennia began. What sort of desperation at world’s end have I yet to see? Mad Max director George Miller must sense the fatigue Read the rest of this entry »

Sacha's TedTed, like Ford in Lie to Me, has negotiated an extension of his existence without regard for a soul. While Ford was willing to trade his soul for a corporeal continuance as a vampire, Ted took another avenue. Back in the 1950s, he programmed what he could of his being into a robot to extend his existence through artificial intelligence, yet as Buffy has warned us with vampirism, this does not equate to extending life. The core of the being, the soul, departs, and though all the wiring and circuitry, be it neurological connections or actual wires, remains, the essence of that person is gone.

Robot Ted is similar to a vampire in that he appears human but lacks Read the rest of this entry »

Whiskey after the Apocalypse. It’s all really going somewhere. Sometimes you have to look at the forest instead of the trees. The episodes are uneven, but the series is not.

I insisted that Mr. Lousy watch Joss Whedon’s Dollhouse this summer, and now my recommendation has been called into question. I am here to respond in part. I take complete responsibility for the recommendation and do not rue making it, though I do have some new thoughts after viewing it sort of in tandem with Lousy, though for me it Read the rest of this entry »

Watching The Thirteenth Floor was for me sort of like going back in time, but not skipping alternate realities like in this movie – going back in time to the nineties video store in Chicago that was housed in the garden apartment on Read the rest of this entry »

Jerry Supiran, child star of the infamous late eighties sitcom, Small Wonder, is broke and homeless.  He played Jamie, the unfathomably annoying son in the home of the family that kept a robot with the form of a little girl in a maid’s uniform as a domestic slave.  I consider him within the bottom five worst child actors in television history.  He is a contender for #1.

I announced this misfortune to my family, who, predictably, almost all  understood the news that I was recounting.  My sister-in-law snapped, “Good!” – with her voice inflecting an unmistakable “Serves him right!” pitiless judgment.  It’s as though his absolutely horrendous performance on the 1980s syndicated sitcom had finally been accounted for and the child actor whose shouting, whiny delivery of inexcusably awful jokes was now paying the Read the rest of this entry »

So often pilots don’t have the feel for the shows that they will later become.

Read the rest of this entry »

Also in the running: all the places name-checked by the Beach Boys in their horrible 1988 song Kokomo.

In the stupendous fourth season finale of Parks & Rec, April panics after she believes she has accidentally mass-deleted documents in the office, and after making an emergency phone call to Andy (who arrives and says something like, “First of all, you did the right thing by hiding under this table”), the two of them brainstorm lists of places where they could begin life as fugitives to escape the consequences of the deletions: worst in April’s mind is a long lecture from Leslie Knope about Read the rest of this entry »

Ok Raul. I’ve watched the first three episodes of Dollhouse. I’m going to wait till I watch the whole season before I write about it in full but I thought I’d give you updates along the way. By the way, I’m glad I waited until the third episode to even look for Read the rest of this entry »

Why am I so irritated with the fourth season of the series Damages, the legal drama starring a Rasputinesque, Machiavellian Glenn Close as ruthless attorney Patty Hewes, and a lovely, doe-eyed, not-as-guileless-as-she looks Rose Byrne, on whom I Read the rest of this entry »

I was recently asked by Mr. Lousy if Dollhouse was worth watching.  Mr. Lousy has seen all the other Joss Whedon series from Buffy to Angel to Firefly, and, like me, was a latecomer to all of them.  (We both overshot Buffy by more than a decade.)  I am going to recommend that Mr. Lousy arrive late to the table once again, bearing in mind that I might not steer others in the same direction, for Dollhouse is the most sci-fi of all the Whedon shows (no – I am not forgetting Firefly) and the most difficult Read the rest of this entry »