Archives for posts with tag: Amy Acker

This Doll was one too many for Mr. Lousy. For Raúl, she was an emotionally wrenching composite of characters with a mystery at the center of her being.

In today’s edition, Raúl will continue to respond to Mr. Lousy’s dissatisfaction with the Joss Whedon series Dollhouse. I have already addressed one complaint, uneven episodes; now, I shall proceed to a second problem: the proliferation/surprise revelations of Read the rest of this entry »

Whiskey after the Apocalypse. It’s all really going somewhere. Sometimes you have to look at the forest instead of the trees. The episodes are uneven, but the series is not.

I insisted that Mr. Lousy watch Joss Whedon’s Dollhouse this summer, and now my recommendation has been called into question. I am here to respond in part. I take complete responsibility for the recommendation and do not rue making it, though I do have some new thoughts after viewing it sort of in tandem with Lousy, though for me it Read the rest of this entry »

I just finished Dollhouse. I’m a little burned out on the Olympics or as NBC presents it – swimming/diving, volleyball, gymnastics and track. I can’t believe I had to go to Bravo at 6am to watch tennis. But I digress.

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Watching The Thirteenth Floor was for me sort of like going back in time, but not skipping alternate realities like in this movie – going back in time to the nineties video store in Chicago that was housed in the garden apartment on Read the rest of this entry »

Ok Raul. I’ve watched the first three episodes of Dollhouse. I’m going to wait till I watch the whole season before I write about it in full but I thought I’d give you updates along the way. By the way, I’m glad I waited until the third episode to even look for Read the rest of this entry »

I’ll get to the movie.  Give me a minute.

In considering Joss Whedon’s TV series, Dollhouse, I recognized that the Dolls could easily be interpreted as Whedon’s meta-commentary on his creation, use, and sometimes disposal of characters, particularly female ones.  (I’ll never forgive him for what he did with Cordelia on Angel.)  Joss Whedon is acutely aware of his position as creator and how his faithfully, or obsessively, his fan base follows his creations.  After Buffy, Angel, and Firefly, he was due some navel-gazing with Dollhouse.

Yet I chose to watch the show from more of a sci-fi perspective than from the standpoint of how a creator considers his creations.  I found the questions raised in Dollhouse about humanness, Read the rest of this entry »